Arch Creek Park

1855 NE 135th Street
North Miami, FL
305-944-6111
Archcreek@miamidade.gov

Park Hours
Wednesdays – Sundays
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
(Closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Years Day)

Directions to Arch Creek Park:

US-1
From North:
Head South on US-1 to 135th Street
Make right (heading East) on 135th Street
Park is on right side of street just before railroad tracks

From South:
Head North on US-1 to 135th Street
Make left (heading East) on 135th Street
Park is on right side of street just before railroad tracks

I-95
From North:
Head South on I-95 to Exit 10B – Opa-locka Blvd / 135th Street
Turn left (heading East) on to NW 135th Street / SR-916 E (2nd traffic light)
Park is on left side of street, just after railroad tracks
May need to make a U-turn just past Biscayne Blvd (US-1)

From South:
Head North on I-95 to Exit 10B – SR-916/ Opa-Locka Blvd / 135th Street
Turn right (heading East) on to NW 135th Street / SR-916 E
Park is on left side of street, just after railroad tracks
May need to make a U-turn just past Biscayne Blvd (US-1)

One Response to “Visit the Park”

  1. Willard Steele Says:

    Hi there. I saw on Wikipedia the various guesses why the bridge fell in 1973. I suppose that the various comments, particularly the placing of the posts at both ends of the bridge, are likely correct about contributing factors are correct. But the direct action that knocked the bridge down is not mentioned. For some days previous to the collapse of the bridge there had been equipment on the tracks of the railroad replacing parts of the track. This include the machines that replaced track, spikes and plates. I lived at 13455 Arch Creek (also 1801 and 1803 Venice Park Drive) which was my parents triplex. During the days preceding the collapse the railroad equipment was hammering away at the track so hard that pictures and plates were being knocked off of my walls by the vibration through the ground. It was memorable. At the end of the work day, the day the bridge fell, that equipment had stopped work when it reached the south side of the railroad bridge that crosses the creek. Next to the Natural Bridge. Which is where they were working that day. Pounding and hammering for hours. That night I was at a friend’s apartment in Venuce Gardens Apartments, second floor middle apartments across the street from the park. When the bridge collapsed we came ruuning out and had a pretty good view of things. We were certainly among the first at the site after the collapse. I mention that because the idea of sabotage was understandable but not true. While many things may have weakened the bridge leading up to its collapse, the work on the railroad that day in the immediate vicinity of the bridge clearly caused the collapse. The next day the work on the railroad stopped and the associated equipment was gone. They didn’t come back to work on the north side anytime soon afterward. If you had spent some days across the street from that work. Felt the constant shaking of the ground, and seen the machine working next to the bridge all day, you’d know what knocked the bridge down, weakened as it may have been. Sorry for the length of this. I just never see anybody mention what finally took the bridge down. I did archaeological work with Bob Carr for many years and worked with the Seminoles as the THPO. So I have a vested interest in the site. That was the first archaeolohical site I worked on in a forty year career. Be safe and Thanks, Bill

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